How To Cope With Irritable Bowel Syndrome

coping with irritable bowel syndrome
Living with irritable bowel syndrome can be challenging, painful, and embarrassing, and it can affect your quality of life. We have compiled some ways to cope with the condition that may help to take the edge off the unpleasant symptoms you experience from irritable bowel syndrome.

(IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder that affects more than 10 percent of adults in the United States, only 5 to 7 percent of whom have received a diagnosis. The condition is twice as likely to occur in women than men and usually happens in people aged 45 and younger.

IBS causes abdominal discomfort, gas, and changes in the patterns of your bowel movements, as well as diarrhea or constipation. The cause of IBS is largely unknown, which hampers the development of effective treatments.

However, there seem to be common triggers for IBS, such as certain foods, stress, and hormonal changes, although these can vary from person to person.

Working out what sparks and eases your IBS can help you to manage the condition and regain control of your life. Here are five steps you can take to avoid triggers, prevent symptom flare-ups, and cope with IBS.

1. Alter your diet

high fiber foodsMaking simple changes to your diet can often provide relief from your IBS symptoms. There is no specific IBS diet as such, and what works for one person may not work for another. Diet-related changes that will work best for you will depend on your symptoms and your reaction to particular foods.

Keeping a food diary can help you to identify the foods that either improve or exacerbate your symptoms. Track the foods that you eat, the symptoms you have, and when they occur.

According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, foods and drinks that have been shown to worsen IBS symptoms include:

Credits: Medical News Today: Coping with irritable bowel syndrome

  • high-fat foods
  • some milk products
  • alcoholic drinks
  • caffeine
  • drinks high in artificial sweeteners
  • beans, cabbage, and other gas-causing foods

The International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders also highlight insoluble fiber, chocolate, and nuts as foods that are likely to cause problems.

Credits: Medical News Today: Coping with irritable bowel syndrome



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